Qualitative Inquiry in Daily Life

David Dwayne Williams
Abstract

This book is meant to teach researchers, evaluators, and practitioners such as educators how to use qualitative inquiry in daily life. Although this book may make the most sense if it is read in sequence, feel free to navigate to any chapter or appendix at any time.

Suggested Citation

Williams, D. D. (2018). Qualitative Inquiry in Daily Life. EdTech Books. Retrieved from http://edtechbooks.org/qualitativeinquiry

Licensing

CC BY: This book is released under a CC BY license, which means that you are free to do with it as you please as long as you properly attribute it.

CC BY
CoverPreface1. Overview of qualitative inquiry and general texts on this topicA School Story of Qualitative InquiryAn Analysis of the StoryQualitative Inquiry ProcessThe Reality about the ProcessOrganization of this BookConclusion2. Assumptions we make in doing qualitative inquirySome Common AssumptionsAn Analysis of AssumptionsCommon Questions about Qualitative InquirySome Additional Beliefs and Assumptions Regarding Human InquiryConclusion3. Keeping a record, writing fieldnotesA StoryAn AnalysisKinds of FieldnotesExampleSome Ideas about Record KeepingMechanics of FieldnotesConclusion4. Relationship building to enhance inquiryAn Article-Based StoryThe ProcessResults and ConclusionAn Analysis of KL's ExperienceConclusion5. Standards and quality in qualitative inquiryA Self-Critique StoryAn AnalysisCredibilityTransferabilityConfirmabilityDependabilityOther CriteriaA ChecklistAudit TrailConclusion6. Focusing the inquiryA School's Superintendent's StoryAn AnalysisConclusion7. Data collectionGathering Through Observations, Interviews and DocumentsAn Assistant Principal's StoryGeneral LessonsObserving LessonsInterviewing LessonsDocument Review LessonsConclusion8. Data interpretationA Graduate Student StoryStory Reading Through Analysis, Synthesis and InterpretationAn AnalysisSpradley's Approach to InterpretationDomain AnalysisConclusion9. Sharing and reportingSharing through Story TellingRevisiting Three StoriesAn Analysis of Three StoriesConclusion10. AppendicesAppendix A.1 - A Sample Study from BYU-Public School PartnershipAppendix A.2 - What Have We Learned?Appendix A.3 - Patterns of ExperienceAppendix B.1 - Allowing Space for Not-Knowing: What My Journal Teaches Me, Part 1Appendix B.2 - Allowing Space for Not-Knowing: What My Journal Teaches Me, Part 2Appendix B.3 - Allowing Space for Not-Knowing: What My Journal Teaches Me, Part 3Appendix B.4 - Allowing Space for Not-Knowing: What My Journal Teaches Me, Part 4Appendix B.5 - Marne's critique of her own studyAppendix C - An Elementary School Example: My Observations of JimmyAppendix D - Reflecting on ReflectionAppendix E - A Study of Educational Change in AlbertaAppendix F - Moving Ahead: A Naturalistic Study of Retention Reversal of Five Elementary School ChildrenAppendix G.1 - An Examination of Teacher ReflectionAppendix G.2 - Themes of ReflectionAppendix H - Spradley's theme synthesis and report writing

David Dwayne Williams

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David Dwayne Williams has conducted more than seventy evaluation studies throughout many countries. He also conducts qualitative research on people’s personal and professional evaluation lives, including how they use evaluation to enhance learning in various settings. He has published more than forty articles and books and made more than one hundred professional presentations examining interactions among stakeholders as they use their values to shape criteria and standards for evaluating learning environments and experiences. As an emeritus professor from IPT at Brigham Young University, he continues exploring evaluation lives through sharing of and commentary on qualitative interviews at his blog site.