CoverObjectivesThe Writing ProcessAddressing the PromptPrewritingWritingRevisingOriginalityEssay Shape and OrganizationIntroduction ParagraphsBody ParagraphsConclusion ParagraphsA Shifting StructureExample EssayUsing SourcesFinding SourcesCitationsQuotingSummarizingParaphrasingReference PagePersonal StatementsExample Personal StatementTypes of Personal StatementsOrganization for Comprehensive Personal StatementOrganization for Personal Statement with PromptRevisionExample Personal StatementCause-Effect EssaysExample Cause-Effect EssayPrewritingWritingRevisingRevise a Cause-Effect EssayArgumentative EssaysExample Argumentative EssayPrewritingWritingRevisingOther Genres of WritingTimed WritingTOEFL Independent WritingTOEFL Integrated WritingStudent Choice (Pick Two)Creative WritingFormal EmailsReflectionsReviewsRefining WritingDevelopmentUnityCohesionDescriptive EssaysExample Descriptive EssayPrewritingWritingRevising

Quoting

When you quote information, you copy the information exactly as you found it. You need to put the source material in quotation marks and include the in-text citation in parentheses. See the example below.

Example: Original Passage

The enormous size, relatively steep submarine slopes, and rapid growth of Hawaiian volcanoes cause them to become gravitationally unstable and collapse. Dozens of giant landslides, some with debris extending more than 200 km from their source, have been recognized along the Hawaiian ridge and around other oceanic volcanoes. These landslides are thought to have produced colossal tsunamis. Thus, landslides from oceanic volcanoes pose a major risk to populations bordering Earth's oceans.

By Michael Garcia Hawaiian Volcanoes: From Source to Surface (published in 2013), page 13

Example: Quote

"Dozens of giant landslides, some with debris extending more than 200 km from their source, have been recognized along the Hawaiian ridge and around other oceanic volcanoes" (Garcia, 2015, p. 13).

You will never just write a quote by itself. When you use a quote, it will part of a sentence.

Example: Quote in context

In recent years, "dozens of giant landslides, some with debris extending more than 200 km from their source, have been recognized along the Hawaiian ridge and around other oceanic volcanoes" (Garcia, 2015, p. 13). This situation provides excellent opportunities to study the cause of these landslides because they are so frequent.

You may choose a quote over a summary because the quote is already fairly concise and does not need to be condensed.

You may choose a quote over a paraphrase because you see a benefit in preserving the author's original wording.

You should not quote large blocks of text, especially in a short essay.

If you quote only a part of a sentence, you should use ellipses (...) to show where there is information missing.