Browse Books by Keyword: "Philosophy of Education"

EdTech in the Wild

Very little of the rich and vibrant history of ed tech is contained in scholarly journals, and what you find there is typically stodgy and manicured: not what you find in classrooms, tech departments, or conversations between professionals. Though peer review and the traditional publishing process are useful for some things, such as ensuring accuracy and uniformity, they are notoriously detrimental to the sharing of novel ideas and practices that shake the status quo.

For that reason, one of the best places to find artifacts of the rich history of educational technology is in self-published blog posts where practitioners, scholars, and anyone else can grapple with the issues that really matter to them, share their crazy ideas, and get feedback from the community without going through a rigid process to determine whether their voices actually matter. These are the hidden historical artifacts of educational technology.

In this volume, we want to bring these blog posts together for future reading and dialogue. Blogs don't live forever, but their ideas can as we archive them and share them in helpful ways.

Creativity and Innovation in Education

Creativity and Innovation in Education: Selections from Educational Technology Magazine is one book in a series of open access books comprised of select articles taken from the popular Educational Technology magazine. This particular book defines creativity and innovation, explains how to foster individual and group creativity and innovation, and describes how to implement creativity and innovation.

Democracy and Education

First published in 1916, this classic continues to influence contemporary educational thought. Considered one of the great American philosophers, Dewey grapples with the nature of knowledge and learning as well as formal education's place, purpose, and process within a democratic society.

The Ends and Means of Education

This book provides a brief introduction into some of the persistent challenges and quandaries facing educators by drawing upon snippets from some of the great philosophers in history, such as Aristotle, Descartes, Rousseau, Dewey, and others.

Don't see an open book in our list? Let us know about it, and we will attempt to include it.